Suleymaniye Mosque

The Süleymaniye Mosque (Turkish: Süleymaniye Camii) is an Ottoman imperial mosque located on the Third Hill of Istanbul, Turkey. It is the second largest mosque in the city, and one of the best-known sights of Istanbul.

Muradiye Complex

The Muradiye Complex or the Complex of Sultan Murat II, the Ottoman sultan who ruled 1421-1451, is located in the city of Bursa in Turkey.

Sultan Murat II was the last of the Ottoman sultans to reign in the original Ottoman capitol of Bursa, previous to the conquest of Constantinople in 1453. There are twelve tombs (türbe) in the complex, all belonging to relatives of this sultan. Construction of the complex began after the completion of the Yeşil Mosque, which is in the eastern area of Bursa. A large earthquake in 1855 damaged much of the Muradiye complex, and restorations have since been completed.

The large complex is composed of the Muradiye Mosque, Muradiye Madrasa, Muradiye Bath, Muradiye Hospice, a fountain, epitaphs, Sultan Murat II’s tomb, Şehzade Ahmed’s tomb, Cem Sultan’s tomb, Şehzade Mahmud’s tomb, Şehzade Mustafa’s tomb, Gülşah Sultan’s tomb, Ebe Hatun’s tomb, Hüna Hatun-Ak Tomb, Mukrime Hatun’s tomb, the Saraylilar tomb, Gülrah Sultan’s tomb and Sirin Hatun’s tomb.

Selimiye Mosque

The Selimiye Mosque (Turkish: Selimiye Camii) is an Ottoman mosque in the city of Edirne, Turkey. The mosque was commissioned by Sultan Selim II and was built by architect Mimar Sinan between 1569 and 1575. It was considered by Sinan to be his masterpiece and is one of the highest achievements of Islamic architecture.

Grand Mosque

Bursa Grand Mosque (Turkish:Ulu Cami) is a mosque in Bursa, Turkey. Ordered by Sultan Bayezid I, the mosque was designed and built by architect Ali Neccar in 1396–1400. The mosque has 20 domes and 2 minarets.

Ulu Cami is the largest mosque in Bursa and a landmark of early Ottoman architecture which used many elements from the Seljuk architecture. It is a large rectangular building, with twenty domes arranged in four rows of five that are supported by twelve columns. Supposedly the twenty domes were built instead of the twenty separate mosques which Sultan Bayezid I had promised for winning the Battle of Nicopolis in 1396. The mosque has two minarets.
There is also a fountain (şadırvan) inside the mosque where worshipers can perform ritual ablutions before prayer; the dome over the şadırvan is capped by a skylight which creates a soft light below, playing an important role in the illumination of the large building.

The horizontally spacious and dimly lit interior is designed to feel peaceful and contemplative. The subdivisions of space formed by multiple domes and pillars create a sense of privacy and even intimacy.

Divriği Great Mosque and Hospital

Divriği Great Mosque and Hospital (Turkish: Divriği Ulu Camii ve Darüşşifası) is an ornately decorated mosque and medical complex built in 1228-1229 in the small eastern Anatolian mountain town of Divriği, now in Sivas Province in Turkey. The architect was Hürremshah of Ahlat and the mosque was built on the order of Ahmet Shah, ruler of the Mengujekids. The inscriptions contain words of praise to the Anatolian Seljuk sultan Alaeddin Keykubad I. The adjoining medical center (darüşşifa) was built simultaneously with the mosque on the order of Turan Melek Sultan, daughter of the Mengujek ruler of Erzincan, Fahreddin Behram Shah.

The exquisite carvings and architecture of both buildings put them among the most important works of architecture in Anatolia and led to their inclusion on UNESCO’s World Heritage List in 1985. Of particular note are the geometrical and floral reliefs on the main door.

Blue Mosque

Blue Mosque or Sultan Ahmed Mosque (Turkish: Sultanahmet Camii) is an historical mosque in Istanbul, the largest city in Turkey and the capital of the Ottoman Empire (from 1453 to 1923). The mosque is popularly known as the Blue Mosque for the blue tiles adorning the walls of its interior.

It was built from 1609 to 1616, during the rule of Ahmed I. Like many other mosques, it also comprises a tomb of the founder, a madrasah and a hospice. While still used as a mosque, the Sultan Ahmed Mosque has also become a popular tourist attraction.

Hagia Sophia

Hagia Sophia (Greek: Ἁγία Σοφία, “Holy Wisdom”; Latin: Sancta Sophia or Sancta Sapientia; Turkish: Ayasofya) is a former Christian patriarchal basilica (church), later an imperial mosque, and now a museum (Ayasofya Müzesi) in Istanbul, Turkey.